Preserve the Season: YES, YOU CAN.

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We were going to tell you to “Can It” or “Put A Lid On It”, but we’re a bit more positive than that- Yes, You CAN. We believe in you. We have all the necessary goodies to can, preserve and savor the flavors of summer and fall before they’re gone. We’re carrying a beautiful line of Le Parfait canning jars, made in France with their signature orange, BPA-free rubber gaskets, guaranteed to seal your jams and jellies. They come in a variety of sizes and make beautiful gifts. Here they are in action! We also sell their screw-top gold lid jars, which come with sealing lids, as well. See them here!

 Not only do we have your jar-game covered, but we’ve also got all the tools necessary to make your canning successful. Think funnels, tongs, pots and more! To learn more about Le Parfait, click here.

Beet Read: The Soil Will Save Us

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By Rachel Caudill, Good Food Book Club Volunteer Coordinator

“Even the broken letters of the heart spell earth.” ~ Daniel Thompson

 Join us in reading the September Co-op Good Food Book Club book, The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Foodies are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet (2014) by Kristin Ohlson. The Book Club will meetSunday, September 28, from 7:00-8:30 at a member’s private residence to discuss The Soil Will Save Us. Email bookclub@moscowfood.coop for more information and directions.

 What is the most singular and unique thing about the Palouse Region? One could rightfully argue….it is our soil. The Palouse fields and hills hide a remarkable substratum; Palouse soils are deeper than Olympic diving pools. And they’re among the richest, most generative soils in the world. Our deep dirt derives from a violent history of massive ice dam breaches, repeated over thousands of years during the last ice age. Known as The Missoula Floods, these herculean deluges dumped immense masses of soil right here beneath us as the waters from behind the colossal ice age dams crashed out across the landscape in unimaginably huge torrents.

 These soils quite literally make the Palouse the Palouse. They make our region unique and special from its very core. There could be no better choice, then, for this month’s “Unique to the Palouse” theme, than the brand-new book The Soil Will Save Us. Here best-selling author and award-winning science writer Kristin Ohslon threads together the best of what our book club has pondered so far this year. Linking ideas from books like Cows Save the PlanetWhole, and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, her thesis is at once familiar but also breakthrough: She takes us to the heart of the matter. Next to the sun, soil is the core, the root, the generative well-spring of all life on Earth. It has the capacity to heal what ails our planet. And for thousands of years, humans knew it. Today, Ohlson reminds us, it’s time to remember.

 From Rodale: “Thousands of years of poor farming and ranching practices—and, especially, modern industrial agriculture—have led to the loss of up to 80 percent of carbon from the world’s soils. That carbon is now floating in the atmosphere, and even if we stopped using fossil fuels today, it would continue warming the planet. In The Soil Will Save Us, journalist and bestselling author Kristin Ohlson makes an elegantly argued, passionate case for ‘our great green hope’—a way in which we can not only heal the land but also turn atmospheric carbon into beneficial soil carbon—and potentially reverse global warming.”

 Her book “…will inspire everyone to rethink the potential of the ground beneath their feet, as well as the landscapes around them, and to figure out how they can make a difference.”

 Please join us to discuss The Soil Will Save Us: How Scientists, Farmers, and Foodies are Healing the Soil to Save the Planet (Rodale 2014) by Kristin Ohlson on Sunday, September 28 from 7:00-8:30 pm. Remember to email bookclub@moscowfood.coop for the meeting location and directions and/or to receive email reminders about the Good Food Book Club. The Soil Will Save Us by Kristin Ohlson is available through your local library.  If you are interested in buying the book, check out the area’s local used book stores or visit Book People of Moscow where Book Club members receive a discount. For more information about the Good Food Book Club click here.

Carrot Applesauce Muffins with Walnuts + Currants

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Apples are starting to make their way into the store (yea fall!) and we’ll be bringing you a ton of recipes and visual guides. These are a healthier-than-usual muffin that use applesauce (we’ll be teaching you how to make your own soon) and shredded carrots, which we have from local farmers. These freeze nicely, so they can be defrosted in the morning quickly for a nice bite in the morning. We added walnuts and currants to ours, but feel free to add in other nuts or fruits or omit entirely.

To make these muffins you will need:

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1/2 cup honey
1 egg at room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
3/4 cup finely shredded carrots (about 2-3 medium carrots)
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup dried currants

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners. In a large bowl whisk together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, and salt. Add the butter, honey, egg, vanilla, and applesauce.
Stir ingredients together until just combined, then add in nuts and currants. Fold in the shredded carrots until combined just combined.  Distribute the batter evenly among the muffin liners (we recommend an ice cream scoop). Bake for 18-20 minutes until a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Remove to a wire rack to cool completely. 

Appy Hour: Fresh Fig Bruschetta

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It’s that special time of year. You’re getting ready to pull out your sweaters and boots and say “sayonara” to tank tops and flip flops. The evenings have a slight chill and pumpkin flavored things are beginning to make an appearance. We love to celebrate the changing seasons at the Co-op with recipes that highlight unique ingredients.

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If the only way you know figs is through Newtons, prepare to be amazed. They offer sweetness, smoothness and crunch all wrapped up into one tiny fruit- which (FUN FACT!) grow on ficus trees. They’re flavor isn’t overpowering, which allows them to pair nicely with a mild cheese and toasted bread.

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Figs will automatically up your host(ess) game, so be prepared for the oohs and aahs at your next shindig.

To make this bruschetta you will need:
1 baguette or loaf of crusty white bread cut into slices and toasted
1/4 cup olive oil
4 ounces of goat cheese, softened
1 pint of fresh figs, sliced thinly
fresh thyme
honey

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Brush bread slices with olive oil and arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes. Let bread cool slightly and spread goat cheese on each piece. Top with slices of fresh figs and a sprinkle of thyme leaves. Drizzle honey over the top and serve.

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Gazpacho

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Although the extreme heat of the summer may be over, the tomatoes are still exploding off their vines. If you’ve made salsa and sauce, sliced them and sprinkled them with salt and eaten them like an apple, you may be in need of a new recipe. Gazpacho is a cold soup made from fresh raw vegetables and is traditionally eaten in Spain and Portugal. There are several ways to prepare it, but here is the Co-op’s recipe.

To make this gazpacho you will need:
1 32oz bottle of tomato juice or enough juice from fresh tomatoes
1 cup chopped cilantro
2 medium cucumbers, peeled and diced
3 large tomatoes, chopped
1 red green pepper, seeded and chopped
1/2 jalapeno, seeded and diced
1/2 red onion, diced
1/4 cup lemon juice
1/4 cup lime juice
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper

In a large bowl combine juices, vinegar, salt and pepper and stir to combine. Prepare all veggies and place into a the bowl with the liquid. Gently stir to combine. Serve with sour cream, cilantro and lime wedges.

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Meet the Makers: New Co-op Sign

Our Meet the Makers series typically features stories and photos about our local artisans and producers who create and grow products in our community. This time, we’re excited to show you the process for making our brand new Moscow Food Co-op sign, which can now be seen hanging above the front of our store. The reason this sign is so special to us is because it was made by hand by three of our talented Co-op employees. Mark, our Facilities Assistant, Chris, our Kitchen Buyer and Bill, our Facilities Manager worked hard to bring a true piece of art to our community.
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Made from Idaho Forest Group cedar planks, Mark helped guide the process to make sure the planks looked seamless and mapped out a plan to ensure the sign is the most durable it can be. Having our staff make the sign meant that we could keep our costs down, keep our dollars in the local economy and showcase our local talent. They projected the sign’s image onto the planks, traced the image and then Chris went to town free-routing the design, cutting out the image so that it is raised from the background.

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He left the words nice and smooth and added a beautiful texture to the background so that image popped out and was more visually appealing. The sign was then stained and sealed so that it will stand up to our climate and was installed at night after the store was closed.

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The metal mounting brackets were made by Mundy’s in Moscow, so really this sign is truly Idaho made! Stop on by and see it in person and let Mark, Chris and Bill know how much you love it.

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Distribution of the Co-op Dollar

Shopping at the Moscow Food Co-op is definitely a different experience than shopping at a conventional grocery store. But do you know why? Take a look at this breakdown of where your money goes when you shop with us!

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Panzanella (Tomato Bread Salad)

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It’s bread… it’s salad… it’s bread… it’s salad! Two words that don’t typically go together, but we think should. And really, who’s favorite part of their salad isn’t the croutons? This recipe for panzanella, or Tuscan tomato bread salad is a great way to use up old bread and use all those tomatoes and peppers from the garden or farmers market. It’s incredibly simple to make– the hardest part is letting the salad rest for an hour while it absorbs the dressing.

To make the panzanella you will need:
1 baguette or loaf of 1-2 day old bread
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pint of cherry tomatoes, sliced in halves or quarters
1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped
2 cloves garlic
1/4 cup chopped basil leaves
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
1/3 cup olive oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Tear or chop bread into bite-size pieces and coat with two tablespoons of olive oil. Spread bread in a single layer on a baking pan and toast for 10-15 minutes. Let cool. In a small bowl whisk together the vinegar, oil, garlic, salt and pepper until well combined. Place bread, tomatoes, peppers and basil in a large bowl. Pour dressing over the top and toss gently to combine. Cover with plastic wrap and let sit for at least an hour, or until the bread has absorbed the dressing.  Garnish with more basil.

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